Blood and faecal lead levels in children with various functional gastrointestinal disorders


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Bilici N. , Sevinç E. , Doğan E. , Sevinç N.

6th World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Kobenhavn, Danimarka, 3 - 06 Haziran 2020, ss.1

  • Basıldığı Şehir: Kobenhavn
  • Basıldığı Ülke: Danimarka
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1

Özet

Objectives and Study: Children tend to show signs of lead toxicity even at low levels As lead poisoning mimics the sign and symptoms of gastrointestinal disease, it can be easily confused as functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). We aimed to investigate the blood lead levels (BLLs) and faecal lead levels in children with various functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and compare it with healthy children.

Methods: This study was carried out at the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Karabuk Training and Education Hospital, Turkey, between january and september 2018. One hundred and two children with FGIDs defined by the Rome IV criteria, aged 5 -18 years, and one hundred and two sex matched healthy children were included in the study. All children with entering the study were confirmed not being organic and metabolic disease by performing a thorough history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Children with FGIDs were divided into three subgroups as functional constipation (FC), functional abdominal pain (FAP) and functional nausea (FN). The blood and faecal lead levels were measured using the graphite

furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (THERMO SCIENTIFIC ICE 3400 AA). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee for Non-invasive Clinical Research of Karabuk University, All participants provided their written informed consent.

Results: The mean age of 102 children with FGIDs (51 males, 50 %) and 102 controls (46 males, 45%) were 12.69 ± 3.61 and 11.35 ± 3.60 years respectively. There were no statistically significance differences between the two groups with respect to age or gender. The median BLLs in the FGIDs group was significantly higher than in controls (5.12 and 1.77 µg/dL, respectively; p< 0.001 ). BLLs were above 5 µg/dl in 51,9 % of children with FGIDs and in 21,6 % of controls. There was a statistically significant difference in BLLs between FC group and the other two subgroups (FAP and FN) (p =0.003, p < 0.001 respectively). The faecal lead level in the FGIDs group was significantly higher than in controls (28.08 and 0.01 ng/mL, respectively; p=0.001) There was no a statistically significant difference in faecal lead levels between subgroup of FC and the other subgroups (FAP and FN) (p =0.992, p = 0.989 respectively). Correlation analysis between the BLLs and faecal lead levels of children with FGIDs have revealed no significant relation (p=0.123).

Conclusion: This study revealed that children with FGIDs had higher blood and faecal lead levels than controls and also more than half of children with FGIDs had BLLs ≥5 µg/dl which is toxic level. Moreover children with FC had higher BLLs than other subgroups. Our results might revive the question of whether or not clinician need to evaluate routine BLLs in children with various FGIDs