Polygenic prediction of the phenome, across ancestry, in emerging adulthood


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Docherty A. R. , Moscati A., Dick D., Savage J. E. , Salvatore J. E. , Cooke M., ...Daha Fazla

PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, cilt.48, ss.1814-1823, 2018 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 48 Konu: 11
  • Basım Tarihi: 2018
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1017/s0033291717003312
  • Dergi Adı: PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1814-1823

Özet

BackgroundIdentifying genetic relationships between complex traits in emerging adulthood can provide useful etiological insights into risk for psychopathology. College-age individuals are under-represented in genomic analyses thus far, and the majority of work has focused on the clinical disorder or cognitive abilities rather than normal-range behavioral outcomes.MethodsThis study examined a sample of emerging adults 18-22 years of age (N = 5947) to construct an atlas of polygenic risk for 33 traits predicting relevant phenotypic outcomes. Twenty-eight hypotheses were tested based on the previous literature on samples of European ancestry, and the availability of rich assessment data allowed for polygenic predictions across 55 psychological and medical phenotypes.ResultsPolygenic risk for schizophrenia (SZ) in emerging adults predicted anxiety, depression, nicotine use, trauma, and family history of psychological disorders. Polygenic risk for neuroticism predicted anxiety, depression, phobia, panic, neuroticism, and was correlated with polygenic risk for cardiovascular disease.ConclusionsThese results demonstrate the extensive impact of genetic risk for SZ, neuroticism, and major depression on a range of health outcomes in early adulthood. Minimal cross-ancestry replication of these phenomic patterns of polygenic influence underscores the need for more genome-wide association studies of non-European populations.