Education and alcohol use: A study of gene-environment interaction in young adulthood


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Barr P. B. , Salvatore J. E. , Maes H., Aliev F., Latvala A., Viken R., ...Daha Fazla

SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE, cilt.162, ss.158-167, 2016 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 162
  • Basım Tarihi: 2016
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.06.031
  • Dergi Adı: SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.158-167

Özet

The consequences of heavy alcohol use remain a serious public health problem. Consistent evidence has demonstrated that both genetic and social influences contribute to alcohol use. Research on gene environment interaction (GxE) has also demonstrated that these social and genetic influences do not act independently. Instead, certain environmental contexts may limit or exacerbate an underlying genetic predisposition. However, much of the work on GxE and alcohol use has focused on adolescence and less is known about the important environmental contexts in young adulthood. Using data from the young adult wave of the Finnish Twin Study, FinnTwin12 (N = 3402), we used biometric twin modeling to test whether education moderated genetic risk for alcohol use as assessed by drinking frequency and intoxication frequency. Education is important because it offers greater access to personal resources and helps determine one's position in the broader stratification system. Results from the twin models show that education did not moderate genetic variance components and that genetic risk was constant across levels of education. Instead, education moderated environmental variance so that under conditions of low education, environmental influences explained more of the variation in alcohol use outcomes. The implications and limitations of these results are discussed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.