Utility of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in the management of acute kidney injury: A prospective, observational study


Isikkent A., YILMAZ S., Ozturan I. U. , DOĞAN N. Ö. , YAKA E., Gultekin H., ...Daha Fazla

HONG KONG JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE, cilt.27, ss.8-14, 2020 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 27 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1177/1024907918806641
  • Dergi Adı: HONG KONG JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.8-14

Özet

Background: Utilization of renal biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in the management of acute kidney injury may be useful as a diagnostic tool in the emergency department. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level and the severity of the acute kidney injury based on the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) classification, and to investigate the role of the serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level in differentiating the etiology and predicting the 30-day mortality rate and need for dialysis. Methods: This prospective, observational study was conducted from March 2015 to 2016. Adult patients with acute kidney injury in the emergency department were enrolled in the study. Demographic and clinical features such as hypovolemic state, nephrotoxic substance exposure, renal functions, and serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level were evaluated. After the etiology of the acute kidney injury was ascertained, the severity of the acute kidney injury was determined according to RIFLE criteria. Primary outcome was defined as the correlation between serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level and the severity of the acute kidney injury according to RIFLE classification. Secondary outcomes were defined as the relationship between the serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level and the etiology of the acute kidney injury; need for dialysis and 30-day mortality were defined as poor outcomes. Results: A total of 87 patients were included in the study. Mean serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels were 380.14 +/- 276.65 ng/mL in RIFLE-R, 425.80 +/- 278.99 ng/mL in RIFLE-I, and 403.60 +/- 293.15 ng/mL in RIFLE-F groups. There was no statistically significant relationship between the severity of acute kidney injuries and serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level. Initial serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in the emergency department did not indicate a statistically significant ability to predict the etiology of acute kidney injury, 30-day mortality rates, or need for dialysis. Conclusion: Initial serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin level in the emergency department is not a determinant tool for predicting the severity, etiology, 30-day mortality rates, or need for dialysis in cases of acute kidney injuries.